Skip to Content

Designing Boston: Can We Talk About Climate Migration?

October 23, 2018 | 6:00 PM - 8:00 PM
Price: Free and open to the public
Where: Fort Point Room, BSA Space, 290 Congress Street, Boston

Designing Boston: Can We Talk About Climate Migration?

Communities around the world are working on solutions to make our buildings, streets and infrastructure resilient to more frequent storms and sea level rise associated with climate change. Very few, however, want to talk about the sensitive topic of managed retreat (commonly known as climate migration). How do you even begin talking about uprooting entire communities? Who will pay for it? Who makes these decisions?

The BSA Foundation is hosting a conversation that starts to address these questions. Hear from planning, economic development and community engagement leaders that have begun the task. Don’t miss the special remote appearance from the Center for Planning Excellence in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, where they are actively working with residents from Isle de Jean Charles on relocating an entire community from their sinking island.

Moderator
Armando Carbonell FAICP, Senior Fellow and Chair, Department of Planning and Urban Form, Lincoln Institute of Land Policy

Speakers
Ona Ferguson, Senior Mediator, The Consensus Building Institute (CBI)
Darci Schofield, Senior Environmental Planner, Metropolitan Area Planning Council (MAPC)
Camille Manning-Broome, President and CEO, Center for Planning Excellence (presenting remotely)
Jeanette Dubinin, Director of Coastal Program, Center for Planning Excellence (presenting remotely)

For those who qualify, 2 LU/HSWs are available.

RSVP

Watch the event below, recorded by WGBH's Forum Network.

Your registration includes acceptance of the BSA Space photo release and consent policy. Registrants to this event will be added to the BSA Space mailing list for updates on future programs and exhibitions. Registrants may unsubscribe at any time. Email addresses will not be shared or sold to third parties.

Image: Isle De Jean Charles. Credit: Karen Apricot, creative commons license, modified.