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Film screening: Sukkah City

October 2, 2015 | 6:00 PM - 8:00 PM
Price: $12 ($8, BSA Members)
Where: BSA Space, 290 Congress Street, Boston

Film screening: Sukkah City

Launching the 2015–2016 BSA Space Film Series: Keeping it Reel is Sukkah City. Go behind the scenes of a national design competition that challenged contemporary architects to design a radical sukkah, a small Jewish hut used for the holiday of Sukkot, using new and inventive materials and forms. Inspirational and compelling, Sukkah City is an in-depth chronicle of how architects approach design challenges and creative processes. Arrive early and engage your senses in Bigger than a Breadbox, Smaller than a Building, an exhibition that explores art installations and architecture. The exhibition closes October 4.

This screening will be held at 6:00 pm on Friday, October 2, at BSA Space (290 Congress Street, Boston) and is the first film in the 2015-2016 BSA Space Film Series: Keeping It Reel documenting some of the ways that architecture and design can engage communities, inspire vision, and provoke change. Complimentary refreshments and popcorn will be served. All proceeds from the series support the BSA Foundation

Synopsis

When best-selling author Joshua Foer began to build his first sukkah, a small hut that Jews build and dwell in every fall for the holiday of Sukkot, he wanted to move beyond the generic plywood boxes and canvas tents that have become the unimaginative status quo. He discovered that while the Bible outlines the basic parameters for what a sukkah should look like and how it should function, it leaves plenty of room for variation and interpretation. Foer thought, What if contemporary architects and designers were challenged to design and construct 12 radical sukkahs? What would they come up with? And so was born the design competition known as Sukkah City in Union Square Park, in the heart of New York City.

Chronicling the competition, the film goes behind the scenes during construction, exhibition, and judging to provide an entertaining and inspiring portrait of the project’s visionary architects and structures—an exciting, singular moment in the American Jewish experience.